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Posts tagged with: Supporting Teens

I’m often asked for reading suggestions as an English teacher, especially for the tweener age group. It’s a good question to ask at that age, given that’s typically when the seed of one’s reading appetite tends to take root. It...
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I’ve often wondered about overlap between anxiety, learning disabilities and ADHD. My assumption, as I think many teachers assume, was that the three go hand in hand. After all, having a learning disability such as dyslexia would be anxiety provoking,...
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A recent study conducted in 2018 by the American College Health Association suggested that 31.9% of College students reported feeling stress & anxiety over the past 12 months, and that is just the number willing to admit it. One can...
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I’ll never forget the warm sweat that would glide down the sides of my shirt as I crept up to the board when Mrs. Phelps would ask me to put a homework problem on the board for Geometry. The room...
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If you’re anything like me, you were a bit excited to get to be your child’s teacher in the spring when the pandemic started. After I dropped my kids off at school, I barely heard anything about what they did...
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I remember when I began teaching trying desperately to cover the entire gamut. When given American Literature it was unfathomable to consider forgoing Edgar Allan Poe or Ernest Hemingway, often the choice. Quite often I’d end up jamming in too...
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Texting has become a routine part of communication to most subcultures in America, but it’s easy to overlook how important it is to teenagers. While to some degree it can seem like an adult “invading the clubhouse” (certainly the case...
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Defense mechanisms take all forms in teenagers; sometimes they masquerade, ironically, as the obvious.  I taught one girl several years ago at Taft, a hockey player, who, upon entering the class for the first time, announced loudly in front of...
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In J.D. Salinger’s canonical work, The Catcher in the Rye, protagonist Holden Caulfield comes to regard himself as rescuer of lost children, explained in the metaphor of catching children in a field of rye before they fall over a cliff: I...
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